Syllabus IELE 5340

 

The School of Integrative and Engaged Learning

Integrated and Engaged Learning Endorsement

 

IELE 5340 Integrating Language Acquisition into Content Instruction 

Instructor:    Dr. Louise Jorgensen
Office:             Home
Office Hours: 9am- 9pm(Mon-Fri)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.            This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phone 435 722 3171(h) 801 367 6683(c)
Credit Hours:  3.0
Course dates: Tuesday
Times: 5 to 8 pm                                                                                                          

Course Description:

6 classes of on-line Canvas instruction plus assignments and 6 hours of Practical/field experience.

Study and apply sheltered instruction models to integrate language acquisition and content instruction in the core curriculum for ESL learners.

Course Objectives:

The Utah ESL Endorsement Standards for Instruction are the basis of the course objectives listed below. As candidates for ESL endorsement, you need to know, understand, and use the Utah English Language Proficiency Standards in selection of programs, practices and strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing ESL and content instruction, including classroom, organization, teaching strategies for development and integrating language skills, and choosing and adapting classroom resources. You must be able to…

  1. Employ theories of first and second language acquisition in teaching content area subjects.
  2. Use language and content objectives in teaching standards-based ESL instruction and the Utah Common Core Curriculum.
  3. Demonstrate ability to plan standards-based ESL and content instruction.
  4. Demonstrate ability to manage and implement standards-based ESL and content instruction.
  5. Employ a variety of strategies, materials, and resources in standards-based ESL and content instruction.
  6. Acknowledge and follow local, state, and federal laws and policies as they pertain to ELLs and their instruction.
  7. Synthesize ESL history and current research into classroom instruction.
  8. Collaborate with colleagues and stakeholders to improve English language learning.

Hybrid course with Practical Experience: 6 face-to-face sessions for 18 hrs (5 to 8:00 Tue nights), 6 hours practical experience and 21 hours of group/outside-of-class work for a total of 45 hours for 3 credits.

To qualify for credit, Southern Utah University requires that learners must complete 15 hours of contact time per credit hour in any given course. (3 credits = 45 hours)

  • Face-to-face sessions will be held in 2019 - January 8 to February 12-    6 sessions will be from 5:00- 8:00 pm
  • Online homework/ collaboration with classmates sessions/reading/posting on canvas will take place between face-to-face session of out-of-class work and will require a total of 21 hours.Descriptions and specific guidelines for virtual/online sessions will be outlined on canvas and will consist of readings, responding to classmates on the discussion site of canvas, articles to review and critique, questions to ponder, selected topics to review and respond to, doing internet searches and research, and preparation for presentations.
  • Field Work/Practical experiences will require a minimum of 6 hours and must be completed during the length of this course. Log and 1 page summary required.

Information contained in this syllabus, other than the policies for grading, late assignments, make-up work, and attendance, is subject to change with advance notice as deemed necessary.

Course Alignment with National and State Standards:

The matrix below indicates the alignment of course objectives and assessments with national education standards, specifically TEAC and INTASC. TEAC refers to the Teacher Education Accreditation Council and INTASC refers to the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium. The eight course objectives come directly from Standard 1: “Language/Linguistics” and Standard 3: “Instruction” of the Utah ESL Endorsement Standards, which are based on the standards of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages).

TEAC Claims &

Threads

INTASC

Course Objectives and Goals

Assessment

1.1 Demonstrate knowledge and competency in the subject(s) they will teach.

1. Discipline Knowledge

1. Employ theories of first and second language acquisition in teaching content area subjects.

2. Use language and content objectives in teaching standards-based ESL instruction and the Utah Core Curriculum.

3. Demonstrate ability to plan standards-based ESL and content instruction.

4. Demonstrate ability to manage and implement standards-based ESL and content instruction.

5. Employ a variety of strategies and resources in standards-based ESL and content instruction.

Session 1: Introduction to the SIOP Model

Session 2: Lesson Preparation

Sessions 2: Building Background Session 3: Comprehensible Input Session 4: Strategies

Session 4: Interaction

Session 5: Practice/Application

Session 6: Lesson Delivery

Session 6: Review and

Assessment

Field/Practical experience

 – Final

Report and Materials

1.2 Demonstrate

pedagogical competency and exhibit effective

elements of teaching in

the area they have chosen.

2. Developmental Knowledge

3. Instructional Adaptability

4. Instructional Variety

5. Effective Learning

Environments

6. Communication Skills

7. Curriculum Planning

8. Assessment Strategies

9. Reflective Practice

1. Employ theories of first

and second language acquisition in teaching

content area subjects.

2. Use language and content objectives in teaching standards-based ESL instruction and the Utah Core Curriculum.

3. Demonstrate ability to plan standards-based ESL and content instruction.

4. Demonstrate ability to manage and implement standards-based ESL and content instruction.

5. Employ a variety of strategies and resources in standards-based ESL and content instruction.

Session 1: Introducing Sheltered

Instruction 

Session 2: Lesson Preparation

Session 2: Building Background Session 3: Comprehensible Input Session 4: Strategies

Session 4: Interaction

Session 5: Practice/Application

Session 5: Lesson Delivery

Session 6: Review and

Assessment

Session 6: Reading Development and Special Education for Ells

     

Field/Practical experience – Final

Report and Materials

1.3 Demonstrate

professional and caring teaching dispositions that

promote effective

teaching and learning.

INTASC has disposition of the

teacher as a domain within each standard.

6. Acknowledge and follow

local, state, and federal laws and policies as they pertain

to ELLs and their

instruction.

8. Collaborate with colleagues to improve ESL instruction.

All Session Assignments

Reflective Concept Map

Field/Practical experience – Final

Report and Materials

TEAC Crosscutting

theme: Learning to

learn.

2. Developmental Knowledge

9. Reflective Practice

7. Synthesize ESL history

and current research into classroom instruction.

Journal Article Critiques

Reflective Concept Map

TEAC Crosscutting

theme: Diversity

(Including Multicultural perspectives and understanding).

3. Instructional Adaptability

10. Community Relations

All eight course objectives.

All Session Assignments

Field/Practical Experience – Final

Report and Materials

TEAC Crosscutting

theme: Technology.

4. Instructional Variety

5. Effective Learning

Environments

6. Communication Skills

8. Collaborate with

colleagues to improve ESL

instruction.

All Session Assignments

Field/Practical Experience – Final Report and Materials

Using Canvas system for various assignments and activities

Targeted Standards:

NCTE/IRA:

  • #3 Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, ad appreciate texts. They draw on prior experiences, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
  • #10 Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop competency in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the curriculum.
  • #12 Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

NCATE:

  • #1Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other professional school personnel know and demonstrate the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

    INTASC:

  • Principle # 1 The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) s/he teaches and can create learning experiences that make those aspects of subject matter meaningful for students.
  • Principle # 3 The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
  • Principle # 4 The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student’s development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.
  • Principle # 5 The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  • Principle # 8 The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner.
  • Principle # 9 The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards:

  • Proposition # 2 Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students.
  • Proposition # 4 Teachers think systematically about their practice and learn from experience.
  • Proposition # 5 Teachers are members of learning communities.

TESOL Standards:

  • Domain # 1  (Language) Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, theories, and research related to the nature and acquisition of language to construct learning environments that support ESOL students’ language and literacy development and content area achievement.
  • Domain # 2 (Culture) Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, theories, and research related to the nature and structure of culture to construct learning environments that support ESOL students’ language and literacy development and content area achievement.
  • Domain # 3 (Planning and Managing Instruction) Candidates know, understand, and are able to use effective practices and strategies related to planning and managing of ESL instruction, including classroom organization, effective teaching strategies for developing and integrating language skills, implementing a variety of teaching strategies, and effectively choosing and adapting classroom resources.
  • Domain # 5 (Professionalism) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the history of ESL teaching. Candidates keep current with new instructional techniques, research results, advances in the ESL fields, and public policy issues. Candidates use such information to reflect upon and improve their instructional practices. Candidates advocate for ESOL students and their families and work collaboratively to improve the learning environment.

Utah State ESL Standards:

  • Standard # 4 Demonstrate competency of ESL methods and strategies in relation to content area instruction and materials.

Required text(s): The texts are an integral part of the class

Echevarría, J., Vogt, M., & Short, D. (2008).  Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners The SIOP Model, 3rd edition. Boston, MA: Pearson Education. (ISBN-10: 0-205-51886-9 or ISBN-13: 978-0-205-51886-9 or the fourth edition ISBN-9780132689724

Vogt, M., & Echevarría, J. (2008).  99 Ideas and Activities for Teaching English Learners with The SIOP Model. Boston, MA: Pearson Education. ISBN-10: 0-205-52106-1 or ISBN-13: 978-0-205-52106-7

Supplemental texts that will be used by the Instructor (students do not need to purchase but could refer to if a copy is available)

Best Practices in Adolescent Literacy Instruction- edited by K. Hinchman & H. Thomas

Content Area Literacy: An Integrated Approach by T.Bean & S. Baldwin

Closing the Achievement Gap: How to reach limited-formal-schooling and Long-term English Learners by Y. and D. Freeman

Developing Academic Language with the SIOP Model by J. Echevarria and D. Short

ESL/ELL Teaching: Principles for Success by Yvonne S. Freeman

40 Strategies for Middle and Secondary classroom: Developing Content Area Literacy by P. Antonacci and C. O’Callaghan

50 Instructional Routines to Develop Content Literacy by D. Fisher and N.Frey

50 Strategies for teaching English Learners by Adrienne L. Herrell

Five Big Ideas: Connecting mind, brain, and education research to classroom practice by D. Wilson and M. Conyers. (2013).

How the ELL Brain Learns by D. A. Sousa

Literacy In the Secondary English Classroom by L. Meeks and C. Austin

Myths and Realties: Best practices for English Language learners by K. D. Samway & D. McKeon

SDAIE: Strategies for teachers of English learners by Jeanne Becijos

Sheltered Content Instruction: Teaching English Language Learners with Diverse Abilities by J. Echevarria and A. Graves

Tools for Teaching Content Literacy by J. Allen

Teaching Content to English Language Learners: Strategies for Secondary School Success by Jodi Reis

Teaching Students to Read Through Their Individual Learning Styles by M. Carbo R. Dunn and K.Dunn

The Art and Science of Teaching by R. Marzano

Understanding by Design by G. Wiggins and J. McTighe

Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning by John Hattie

IELE 5340 Tentative Schedule of Activities for Fall Semester 2017

Week

Date

Day

Topic

Due

 

8/29

in class

T

- Read syllabus, discuss assignments- start searching for research/journal articles to read and critique.  Answer self-assessment (canvas #1)

8/29

 1

8/29

in-class

T

Review demographics and self-assessment, pedagogy vs. andragogy, 7 P’s strategy, ESL terms, discuss Chapters 1& 2 in SIOP text,  discuss key questions,  mainstream curriculum, diversity issues, instructional core,  content teachers,  leveling the playing field and legal issues.

Go to discussion page on canvas and answer question # 1 and question # 4 found

at the end of chap one in SIOP  text and respond to the comments of, at least 2, classmates.

Go to the assignment page and read posted articles ( Overview of Academic vocabulary research & Literacy curriculum guidelines ). Write 2 paragraphs explaining how this applies to your educational situation. Be ready to share ideas in the next class. Read chapters 3 & 4 for next week.  Bring a textbook you use so we can look at the academic vocabulary.

8/29

2

9/5

in class

T

Discuss questions from chapters 1 & 2, discuss Chapters 3 & 4, discussion/reading of supplemental texts, quiz on VIP terms, discuss cultural issues, multicultural DVD,  multiple intelligences, affective filter , use of multicultural literature ,work on academic language , vocabulary and  reading issues , learn about the author of the text and SIOP, do the Belief questions and 6 factors of comprehension.

Go to discussion page on canvas and answer question # 1 at end of chapter 3 and  # 1 in chapter 4 then respond to 2 classmates.

Go the assignment page and read posted article (When students cannot read grade level texts)  and write 2 paragraphs how this applies to your situation. For next week read chapter 5 in text and examine the text 99 Ideas and activities. Choose one that is meaningful to you and tell how you could use it (in class 3,4,or 5.)

9/5

3

9/12

T

Discuss/activities of Chapter 5, discussion questions, strategy presentations,  article discussion , critical thinking skills, supplemental texts, developing questions, math skills,  varied lesson plans, modifying  whole class assignments,  types of learning, wait time, report on literacy, curriculum issues, etc.

Go to discussion page on canvas and answer questions # 1 and # 1 & 2 (pg at end of chap 5 and  respond to 2 classmates.

Go to assignment page and read posted article  (A conceptual framework for the education students of diversity) and respond in 2 paragraphs how this applies to you. Be ready to share ideas in class. Read Chapters 6 & 7 for next week.

9/12

         

4

9/19

T

Discuss/activities of Chapter 6 & 7, supplemental text/reading discussion, strategy presentations, article  discussions , lesson planning, 75 teaching ideas, DVD on ESL classes, developing questions, Bloom and Kaagan, , supplemental texts, electronic texts., look at issue in teaching science, etc.

 Go to discussion page on canvas and answer questions # 1, 2 , 3 at end of chapter. Respond to 2 classmates.

Go to assignment page and read posted article (Content textbooks; friends or foes) and respond in 2 paragraphs how this applies to you.

 Be ready to share in class. Read chapters 8 & 9 for next week.

9/19

5

9/26

T

Discuss/activities of Chapter 8 & 9, supplemental text/reading discussion. Strategy presentations, article discussions, teaching social studies and physical education issues, CALLA method.  Critical thinking and reasoning activities , etc..

Go to discussion page and answer question # 3 at the end of chapter 8 and # 2 in chap 9, respond to 2 classmates.  Read the posted article (Architects of the Intellect) for discussion in next class.  Read chapters 10 and 11 for class 6.

9/26

6

10/3

T

 Discuss/activities of Chapters 10 & 11,  article discussion, , writing fo5 ELL’s, Needs of ESL , current self assessment,  present Lesson plans applying SIOP Model, Sp ed issues ,  assessment issues, read article called How Important is Teaching Literacy  in All Content Areas, 10 signs of a 21st century classroom, 10 teaching behaviors, closure

10/3

         
         
           

                                                                                                                        _____________

Grading Policy & Scale

Your scores on all coursework will be reported to you using the Canvas system; and your final grade will be based on the percentage of points you earn out of the total points possible on your assignments.

A

=

95/100% 550-600 pts

 

B-

70-75% 350-400 pts

     

A-

=

85-95% 500-550 pts

 

C+

65-70% 300-350 pts

     

B+

=

80-85% 450-500 pts

 

C

60-65% 250-300 pts

     

B

=

75-80 % 400-450 pts

           

Grading: 

Class attendance, participation & canvas posting         6 classes              @ 20 points per class  (95%)  = 120 pts

Article critiques (6 read and discussed-canvas/class)   6 critiques          @ 10 points                 (95%)  =  60 pts

Strategy presentation -10 in journal-1 presentation     10 strategies         @ 10 points                 (95%)  = 100 pts

Reflective Concept Map/Journal                                    6 classes            @ 10 points each         (95%)  =   60 pts

2 SIOP lesson plans                                                  2 plans               @ 100 pts each            (95%)  = 200 pts

Study Questions on discussion page                                     6 classes             @ 10 pts each              (95%)  =   60

                                                                                                            total               =              600 pts                                          __________

English as a Second Language Practical/Field Experiences (.5 credit):

6 hours required/ log and 1 page reflection paper.

Each course in SUU’s ESL Endorsement program includes a practical experience component. The ESL practical experience component is to provide teachers with an opportunity to document the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for successful classroom implementation of ESL best practices. Below are some examples of beneficial practical experiences;

  • ESL classroom observation
  • ESL Master teacher observation
  • ESL individualized instructional session
  • ESL peer tutoring session
  • ESL group instructional session
  • Observation, participation and/or review of differentiated instructional strategies
  • Involvement in ESL mentoring program
  • Review of classroom/school ESL media/curricular materials
  • Review/participation in ESL assessment and evaluation strategies
  • Attendance at an ESL/Bilingual professional development conference
  • Attendance at school functions or extra-curricular activities that promote family, community, and school partnerships
  • Participation at local community councils or PTA meetings
  • Using ESL strategies in your classroom
  • Research of past and current ESL literacy /content programs
  • Planning or participation in a school/district program that supports ESL Literacy/language acquisition
  • Research and share ESL/ELL internet sites and rate their usefulness.
  • Read and share current, relevant articles about ESL teaching.
  • Create (observe and /or teach- if possible) a content lesson plan with strategies and assessments. Tell about it in class. Use a rubric to assess effectiveness/adaptations.
  • Research, review, try, and report on 10 strategies used in a content class.
  • Keep a reflective log of strategies used in the content area.
  • Demonstrate, and report in class, the use of literature, music and fine arts in an ESL content lesson.
  • Assess (or observe) an ELL student- using a teacher observation checklist.
  • Assess (or observe) an ELL student –using an authentic assessment.
  • Use (or observe) a language assessment to determine L1 and L2 literacy competence.

Assignments

  1. Reflective Concept Map /Journal (60 points)

          At the end of each session and at the end of each Echeverria chapter you are to create a concept map in your journal (digital, hard copy, etc.)   Using the 7 P’s strategy as a guide, you will list/identify the main points of the chapter and list 2-3 strategies that the author/instructor suggest for practitioners to use in the classroom that coordinate with each main idea. You should synthesize your prior knowledge, past /current research, best practices/strategies and how this information applies to your teaching philosophy and practice.

On Canvas discussion page---- In a minimum of 2 paragraphs, respond to the weekly reading assignments and handouts with your overall impressions of the material and how it may influence your curriculum development and lesson design. This is your chance to make new connections with the information and it’s practical application. Respond to the comments of, at least, 2 classmates.

  1. Study Questions (60 points)

          At the end of each chapter is a list of questions. These questions ask you to place yourself in a context where the information you just read is applicable. The questions are not simply a regurgitation of the facts. They are designed to push you to think deeply about the materials and information as well as how you position yourself as an ESL teacher. Probe deep to make connections to (1) core standards in specific content areas, (2) TESOL standards, and (3) culturally relevant curriculum design. Be ready to lead a short class discussion and share your insights on 2 your questions as students will be picked randomly each class session.

  1. Journal Article Critiques (10 Points each)

 At least six articles will be assigned to be read and discussed in class- these will help  you improve your knowledge and understanding of integrating e acquisition into content instruction. The articles come from reliable, academic/professional sources (e.g., Phi Delta Kappan, The Journal of Educational Research, Educational Leadership).

  1. Strategy Presentation (100 points)

You will record, at least 10 learning/teaching strategies in your Reflective Concept Map/Journal. These can be original ones you use in your class, ones suggested in class or from the texts and then tell how you implemented/adapted them to your teaching situation. Assignments will be made to present one in class and why it was effective/adapted/discarded.

  1. Final Lesson Plans Project (100 points possible for each lesson plan)

You will prepare two content area lessons, using the SIOP lesson plan templates found in Appendix B of the Echevarria text. Apply concepts and principles from this course to a content area and grade level you teach or intend to teach in the future.   Be prepared to share one of your lesson plans in the last class.

100 points each lesson plan

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  

Digital Signature of Field/Practical Experience Liability Statement

BEFORE you proceed with your Field/Practical Experience you must read the following statement and then go to Canvas Assessments and complete the Digital Signature of Service- Learning Liability Statement. The most efficient way for students to acknowledge having read and agreed to the Service-Learning Liability Statement is to present it as a Canvas Quiz.  All students in the course must complete it.

 Service-Learning Liability Statement

Engaging in a service-learning project requires you to go out into the “real world” and perform some kind of service; thus, there may be potential “real world” risks to you.  You must use common sense and professional judgment.  Whether you decide to provide ESL tutoring for children, teenagers, or adults,

you MUST adhere to the following guidelines in order to minimize potential risks:

  1. You are strongly advised to meet with your student(s) in a public place where other adults can easily observe you, such as in a school or public library.
  2. DO NOT meet with only one student in a room where you are completely alone together and unobserved. Tutoring sessions in private residences, or in rooms where you cannot be easily observed, MUST be conducted in the presence of another adult, such a parent or other classmate.

Communication

  1. Setting Up Your Canvas Profile and Notifications

Your Canvas Profile and Notifications need to be set up for efficient and effective communication. Log in to the Canvas system; then click on the Profile link in the upper right area of the window. In your Profile window, look for “Ways to Contact” in the upper right corner. Your preferred e-mail address that you gave to SUU should be there. You may add other contact methods, such as text messages on your cell phone. In your profile, your Full Name should match your official name in the SUU Registration system for grading purposes. However, you may change your Display Name to whatever you prefer to be called, but please include your last name, too. Click the Edit Profile button to do this. To add a profile picture, click the image area of the Profile window. For the best results, make sure your image dimensions are square (preferably 60X60 pixels), with a close-up of your face in the center. Please use a real picture of yourself, not a cartoon avatar. In the Web Services area of the Profile window, you can register web

tools you already use, such as Google Docs, Skype, Facebook, and others, to link up with Canvas.

You can set up Notifications to contact you at your preferred e-mail address or to send a text message to your cell phone to let you know that new information has been posted on Canvas. Click the Notifications link on the left side of the Profile window. For various tools, the Notification Preferences can be set to Right Away, Daily, Weekly, and Never. Canvas requires at least one Right Away for e-mail. If you want, you may leave all Notifications set at Right Away; but for this course, the MINIMUM recommended is to have Right Away set for New Announcements, Calendar Changes, Due Date Changes, Course Grading Alerts, Membership Update Notifications, and New Email Messages.

  1. Communicating with the Instructor

You can use the Canvas system to send messages to your instructor. In the “People” area, click on

your instructor’s name; then click the “Message” button in the upper right corner of the window. You can

also go to the Inbox; then in the New Message area, click the little person-icon at the end of the “To” box and find your instructor's name in the course member list, or simply click in the “To” box, enter the name, and click the contact link when it appears. You can also use the Inbox to send a message to the class. Be careful to avoid doing this accidentally; otherwise, what you intended to say to one person may be sent to everyone. Regular e-mail addresses will not work in the “To” box of the Canvas messaging system.

You may also use regular email- (address on first page of syllabus.)

 

  1. Communicating with Classmates

You can communicate with other students in EESL 4320/6320 in Canvas using three different methods: (1) People (send messages to individuals), (2) Discussions (send messages to your assigned group or to the entire class), and (3) Chat (for simultaneous written conversations).  If you want to use Canvas Chat to have a live, written conversation with someone, it is usually best to set an appointment to “meet” in the Chat area. You are not required to use Canvas Chat. It is available for your convenience.

Please be courteous and respectful in all of your communications with each other.

Academic Integrity

Scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated and will be prosecuted to the fullest extent. You are expected to have read and understood the current issue of the student handbook (published by Student Services) regarding student responsibilities and rights, and the intellectual property policy, for information about procedures and about what constitutes acceptable behavior.

 Students with Disabilities

Students with medical, psychological, learning or other disabilities desiring academic adjustments, accommodations or auxiliary aids will need to contact the Southern Utah University Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD), in Room 206F of the Sharwan Smith Center or phone

435-865-8022. SSD determines eligibility for and authorizes the provision of services.

 Emergency Management

In case of emergency, the University’s Emergency Notification System (ENS) will be activated. Students are encouraged to maintain updated contact information using the link on the homepage of the mySUU portal. In addition, students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Emergency Response Protocols posted in each classroom. Detailed information about the University’s emergency management plan can

be found at http://www.suu.edu/emergency.

 Compliance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008

The sharing of copyrighted material through peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing, except as provided under

U.S. copyright law, is prohibited by law. Detailed information can be found at http://www.suu.edu/it/p2p- student-notice.html.

 Attendance & Participation

At its root, the word “attend” has a deeper meaning than just “to be present.” According to Random House Webster’s College Dictionary (1991), the intransitive form of “attend” means “to apply oneself; to pay attention; to listen or watch alertly.” It implies personal responsibility.  In this sense, “attendance” is a vital part of the learning process in any class, and even more so in a Web-based class, where you MUST apply yourself, pay attention, and watch alertly in order to succeed. One measure of “attendance” in an Internet course is “participation” on a discussion board.  Points will be awarded for participation in class discussions using the Canvas system.

Each assignment in this course has a specific due date listed next to its link in Canvas.   Any makeup work must be arranged by the student within one week of the scheduled due date (at the option of the instructor).

 

9

 

Tags: ESL,, SUU Payment,, SUU

Print Email

0
0
0
s2smodern